Contact Information

Theodore Lowe, Ap #867-859
Sit Rd, Azusa New York

We Are Available 24/ 7. Call Now.

[ad_1]

Aug 17, 2023

Today it’s taken for granted that we as Christians are called to
“engage the culture” in order to evangelize. Often “engaging the
culture” means paying an inordinate amount of attention to popular
commercial entertainment in order to show unbelievers how hip we
are, straining to find a “Christ-figure” in every comic book movie,
and making worship music as repetitive, melodically banal, and
emotionalistic as possible. Past a certain point, “cultural
engagement” begins to seem like a noble-sounding excuse to enjoy
mediocrity – and Christians, unfortunately, are as much in love
with mediocre entertainment as anyone else.

The novel doctrine of “cultural engagement” is just one subject
covered in Joshua Gibbs’s challenging and entertaining new book,
Love What Lasts: How to Save Your Soul from Mediocrity.
Joshua joins Thomas Mirus for a wide-ranging conversation about how
we choose to spend our free time and why it matters.

Topics include:

  • The dangers of artistic mediocrity
  • The importance of boredom
  • Why streaming has been terrible for music
  • The different kinds of Christian “cultural engagers”
  • Uncommon and common good things and how both are threatened by
    the mediocre
  • How the “special” apes the holy
  • The meme-ification of art

Links

Gibbs, Love What Lasts: How to Save Your Soul from
Mediocrity https://circeinstitute.org/product/love-what-lasts/

Gibbs, “Film As a Metaphysical Coup” https://circeinstitute.org/blog/film-metaphysical-coup/

Thomas’s favorite episode of Gibbs’s
podcast, Proverbial https://shows.acast.com/proverbial/episodes/how-to-buy-a-bottle-of-wine

www.GibbsClassical.com

SUBSCRIBE to the Catholic Culture Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-catholic-culture-podcast/id1377089807

DONATE to make this show possible! http://catholicculture.org/donate/audio

Go to Catholic Culture’s website for tons of written content,
including news, articles, liturgical year info, and a vast library
of documents: https://www.catholicculture.org



[ad_2]

Source link

Share: