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The day many Granite Staters have waited years for has arrived. For the first time since 1959, a total solar eclipse will be visible in New Hampshire later Monday. A partial eclipse will be visible — with the proper eyewear — across the entire state from after 2:15 p.m. to after 4:30 p.m. The eclipse will reach totality around 3:30 p.m. in several northern New Hampshire communities, including Pittsburg, Stewartstown, Colebrook and Lancaster. Elsewhere across New Hampshire, the moon will block about 95% of the sun at around 3:30 p.m.>> Track the eclipse’s path of totality with this interactive mapSee live updates here, and scroll down for a list of linked resources to help you enjoy this momentous event:3:57p.mWMUR’s Steve Bottari said he feels the warmth coming back. Views are heading back to their cars in Stewartstown, NH. 3:53p.m.Cars beep their goodbyes to Hayley LaPoint as they head home after totality in Pittsburg, NH. Hayley reports seeing “endless cars.”3:52p.m.Chief Meteorologist Mike Haddad said 95% totality was reached in Manchester, NH during totality. 3:47p.m.WMUR’s Arielle Metropolis spoke with with some younger students who talked about how much they enjoyed the experience as the sun continues to come back in Concord, NH. 3:39p.m. WMUR’s Hayley LaPoint said sun has not been revealed past 50% yet in Pittsburg, NH. 3:35p.m.Steve Bottari reports brightening in Stewartstown after peak totality.3:33p.m. Hayley LaPoint says totality has concluded in Pittsburg as light quickly comes back. 3:32p.m.WMUR’s Steve Bottari said temperatures have really dropped in Stewartstown. The area has gone almost completely silent as viewers watch in awe. 3:29p.m.Meteorologist Hayley LaPoint said peak totality has been reached in Pittsburg, NH. She adds that it’s dark as night, seeing stars and planets. 3:27p.m.WMUR’s Steve Bottari reports in Stewartstown seeing only a slight sliver of the sun as totality approaches. WMUR’s Arielle Metropolis said 96% coverage in Concord, NH with signs of darkness. 3:22 p.m.WMUR’s Hayley LaPoint says light is fading very quickly in Pittsburg, NH. 3:04 p.m.Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint said we are about 50% coverage for the eclipse. 3 p.m.Watch our live coverage of Eclipse in the 603 in the player above.2:15 p.m.The solar eclipse has started! The moon is beginning to cross over the surface of the sun. In areas in the path of totality, the eclipse should become total at about 3:30 p.m., depending on your location.2:05 p.m.Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint provides an update from Pittsburg, which is in the path of totality. 1:31 p.m.Plymouth State University students launched a weather balloon in Pittsburg ahead of the eclipse. Totality in that area is around 3:30 p.m.1:24 p.m.Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint is in Pittsburg where she spotted $50 parking at the Pittsburg School.1:17 p.m.Crowds are gathering at Coleman State Park in Stewartstown to watch the eclipse. Stewartstown is in the path of totality. WMUR’s Steve Bottari is there and had an update in our 12:30 p.m. show.12:48 p.m. Meteorologist Jacqueline Thomas and photographer Joel Wade have made it to the Mount Washington Auto Road and have begun their trip up the road! They are in a passenger van with cans and spikes. 12:43 p.m.WMUR’s Arielle Mitropoulos and photographer Tim Alipalo are heading to Concord to watch the eclipse. 12:04 p.m.New Hampshire State Police posted a video to X, formerly known as Twitter, showing the view from above of the traffic on I-93 north in the Hooksett area. 11:53 a.m. Watch aerial video of heavy traffic continuing on I-93 north through the Hooksett area.11:42 a.m.Meteorologist Jacqueline Thomas and photographer Joel Wade made a pit stop in Intervale before heading to the Mount Washington Auto Road.11:15 a.m. Traffic remains heavy in parts of New Hampshire, like I-93 north through the Hooksett area and through Franconia Notch. WMUR’s Katherine Underwood gave an update on the traffic conditions around the state.10:58 a.m.Meteorologist Jacqueline Thomas and photographer Joel Wade are heading to Mount Washington for the eclipse. They have been encountering traffic this morning.10:57 a.m.Video posted to the ULocal New Hampshire page showed bummer to bummer traffic Monday morning on 1-93 north through Franconia Notch. 10:44 a.m.WMUR’s Steve Bottari is at Coleman State Park in Stewartstown where he said there is not a single cloud in the sky. He observed license plates from all over the country; Virginia, Idaho and Arizona. Downtown Lancaster and Colebrook was bustling with people and local shops were selling eclipse merchandise. 10:25 a.m.Traffic maps show heavy traffic on I-93 north through Franconia Notch. An image from New Hampshire Department of Transportation shows the back-up.10:09 a.m.Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint made it Colebrook and said it was busy and there were long lines at the Dunkin’. See video of the crowds below.9:37 a.m.Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint, who is heading to Pittsburg, saw some people selling backyard parking spaces anywhere between $20 to $40 per car in the Columbia area. 9:04 a.m.WMUR’s Ray Brewer is in Concord and said once drivers get north of the I-93, I-89 spit, traffic thins out considerably. 8:52 a.m.Traffic is heavy on Interstate 93 north through the Hooksett area. Traffic maps show it starting at the I-293 and I-93 merge and going up to the area of the Bow Junction.8:00 a.m.The State Emergency Operations Center was activated at a partial activation level to help communities in the path of totality, according to New Hampshire Homeland Security and Emergency Management. 7:59 a.m.WMUR’s Steve Bottari is heading to the the area in the path of totality and traffic is stop and go on I-93 north through Franconia Notch5:30 a.m.Traffic is heavier than usual on I-93 north through the Hooksett area. 5 a.m. The eclipse begins in a little more than seven hours as a partial one, which means the moon will block out part of the sun beginning at that time. The entire state will be able to see a partial eclipse. In about eight and a half hours, the eclipse will become total for a few in parts of northern New Hampshire, as the moon will fully cover the sun for a few minutes. Some New Hampshire schools are closing for the day or releasing students early because of this amazing spectacle. It’s the first chance for Granite Staters to see a total solar eclipse in 65 years. After this one, a total solar eclipse won’t be visible in New Hampshire until 2079, which is 55 years from now. New Hampshire solar eclipse resourcesEverything you need to know about the total solar eclipse Total solar eclipse 2024 path of totality interactive mapTimeline for the April 8 solar eclipsePath of total solar eclipse will cut across northern New Hampshire Some NH schools announce closings, early dismissals for total solar eclipse MondayNew Hampshire total solar eclipse parking: Where the state says you can go Before 2024, there were just two total solar eclipses in New Hampshire since 1867 After 2024, when will New Hampshire see its next total solar eclipse?

The day many Granite Staters have waited years for has arrived. For the first time since 1959, a total solar eclipse will be visible in New Hampshire later Monday.

A partial eclipse will be visible — with the proper eyewear — across the entire state from after 2:15 p.m. to after 4:30 p.m. The eclipse will reach totality around 3:30 p.m. in several northern New Hampshire communities, including Pittsburg, Stewartstown, Colebrook and Lancaster. Elsewhere across New Hampshire, the moon will block about 95% of the sun at around 3:30 p.m.

>> Track the eclipse’s path of totality with this interactive map

See live updates here, and scroll down for a list of linked resources to help you enjoy this momentous event:

3:57p.m

WMUR’s Steve Bottari said he feels the warmth coming back. Views are heading back to their cars in Stewartstown, NH.

3:53p.m.

Cars beep their goodbyes to Hayley LaPoint as they head home after totality in Pittsburg, NH. Hayley reports seeing “endless cars.”

3:52p.m.

Chief Meteorologist Mike Haddad said 95% totality was reached in Manchester, NH during totality.

3:47p.m.

WMUR’s Arielle Metropolis spoke with with some younger students who talked about how much they enjoyed the experience as the sun continues to come back in Concord, NH.

3:39p.m.

WMUR’s Hayley LaPoint said sun has not been revealed past 50% yet in Pittsburg, NH.

3:35p.m.

Steve Bottari reports brightening in Stewartstown after peak totality.

3:33p.m.

Hayley LaPoint says totality has concluded in Pittsburg as light quickly comes back.

3:32p.m.

WMUR’s Steve Bottari said temperatures have really dropped in Stewartstown. The area has gone almost completely silent as viewers watch in awe.

3:29p.m.

Meteorologist Hayley LaPoint said peak totality has been reached in Pittsburg, NH. She adds that it’s dark as night, seeing stars and planets.

3:27p.m.

WMUR’s Steve Bottari reports in Stewartstown seeing only a slight sliver of the sun as totality approaches.

WMUR’s Arielle Metropolis said 96% coverage in Concord, NH with signs of darkness.

3:22 p.m.

WMUR’s Hayley LaPoint says light is fading very quickly in Pittsburg, NH.

3:04 p.m.

Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint said we are about 50% coverage for the eclipse.

3 p.m.

Watch our live coverage of Eclipse in the 603 in the player above.

2:15 p.m.

The solar eclipse has started! The moon is beginning to cross over the surface of the sun. In areas in the path of totality, the eclipse should become total at about 3:30 p.m., depending on your location.

2:05 p.m.

Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint provides an update from Pittsburg, which is in the path of totality.

1:31 p.m.

Plymouth State University students launched a weather balloon in Pittsburg ahead of the eclipse. Totality in that area is around 3:30 p.m.

1:24 p.m.

Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint is in Pittsburg where she spotted $50 parking at the Pittsburg School.

1:17 p.m.

Crowds are gathering at Coleman State Park in Stewartstown to watch the eclipse. Stewartstown is in the path of totality. WMUR’s Steve Bottari is there and had an update in our 12:30 p.m. show.

12:48 p.m.

Meteorologist Jacqueline Thomas and photographer Joel Wade have made it to the Mount Washington Auto Road and have begun their trip up the road! They are in a passenger van with cans and spikes.

mount washington auto road

van with chains on tires

12:43 p.m.

WMUR’s Arielle Mitropoulos and photographer Tim Alipalo are heading to Concord to watch the eclipse.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

12:04 p.m.

New Hampshire State Police posted a video to X, formerly known as Twitter, showing the view from above of the traffic on I-93 north in the Hooksett area.

11:53 a.m.

Watch aerial video of heavy traffic continuing on I-93 north through the Hooksett area.

11:42 a.m.

Meteorologist Jacqueline Thomas and photographer Joel Wade made a pit stop in Intervale before heading to the Mount Washington Auto Road.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

11:15 a.m.

Traffic remains heavy in parts of New Hampshire, like I-93 north through the Hooksett area and through Franconia Notch. WMUR’s Katherine Underwood gave an update on the traffic conditions around the state.

10:58 a.m.

Meteorologist Jacqueline Thomas and photographer Joel Wade are heading to Mount Washington for the eclipse. They have been encountering traffic this morning.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

10:57 a.m.

Video posted to the ULocal New Hampshire page showed bummer to bummer traffic Monday morning on 1-93 north through Franconia Notch.

10:44 a.m.

WMUR’s Steve Bottari is at Coleman State Park in Stewartstown where he said there is not a single cloud in the sky. He observed license plates from all over the country; Virginia, Idaho and Arizona. Downtown Lancaster and Colebrook was bustling with people and local shops were selling eclipse merchandise.

10:25 a.m.

Traffic maps show heavy traffic on I-93 north through Franconia Notch. An image from New Hampshire Department of Transportation shows the back-up.

traffic through franconia notch

10:09 a.m.

Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint made it Colebrook and said it was busy and there were long lines at the Dunkin’. See video of the crowds below.

9:37 a.m.

Meteorologist Hayley Lapoint, who is heading to Pittsburg, saw some people selling backyard parking spaces anywhere between $20 to $40 per car in the Columbia area.

9:04 a.m.

WMUR’s Ray Brewer is in Concord and said once drivers get north of the I-93, I-89 spit, traffic thins out considerably.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

8:52 a.m.

Traffic is heavy on Interstate 93 north through the Hooksett area. Traffic maps show it starting at the I-293 and I-93 merge and going up to the area of the Bow Junction.

8:00 a.m.

The State Emergency Operations Center was activated at a partial activation level to help communities in the path of totality, according to New Hampshire Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

7:59 a.m.

WMUR’s Steve Bottari is heading to the the area in the path of totality and traffic is stop and go on I-93 north through Franconia Notch

traffic on i-93 north through franconia notch

5:30 a.m.

Traffic is heavier than usual on I-93 north through the Hooksett area.

5 a.m.

The eclipse begins in a little more than seven hours as a partial one, which means the moon will block out part of the sun beginning at that time. The entire state will be able to see a partial eclipse.

In about eight and a half hours, the eclipse will become total for a few in parts of northern New Hampshire, as the moon will fully cover the sun for a few minutes.

Some New Hampshire schools are closing for the day or releasing students early because of this amazing spectacle.

It’s the first chance for Granite Staters to see a total solar eclipse in 65 years. After this one, a total solar eclipse won’t be visible in New Hampshire until 2079, which is 55 years from now.

New Hampshire solar eclipse resources



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